Sat. Feb 24th, 2024

I. Introduction
A. Definition of Esports
B. Importance of Esports Today
C. Brief History of Esports
II. The Early Years of Esports
A. Origin of Video Games
B. First Esports Competitions
C. Emergence of Professional Esports Players
III. The Rise of Esports in Asia
A. South Korean Esports Scene
B. Japanese Esports Industry
C. Impact of Esports on Asian Culture
IV. The Globalization of Esports
A. Growth of Esports in North America
B. Expansion of Esports in Europe
C. Current State of Esports in Other Regions
V. The Art and Culture of Esports
A. Role of Art in Esports
B. Influence of Esports on Popular Culture
C. The Future of Esports Art and Culture
VI. Conclusion
A. Summary of Esports Evolution
B. Current State of Esports
C. Future of Esports

Esports, short for electronic sports, refers to competitive video gaming. It is a form of competition where players or teams compete against each other in video games. The popularity of esports has been on the rise in recent years, with major tournaments attracting millions of viewers and big corporations investing in esports teams. But how did esports originate? In this article, we will take a comprehensive look into the evolution of competitive gaming, from its humble beginnings to the multi-billion dollar industry it is today.

II. The Early Years of Esports

A. Origin of Video Games

Video games have come a long way since their inception in the 1960s. The first video game, called “Spacewar!” was created in 1962 by a group of students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). It was a simple game that involved two spaceships flying around a screen, firing at each other. However, it marked the beginning of a new era in entertainment and sparked the development of numerous video games that followed.

The early video games were primarily developed for scientific research purposes, as a way to study human-computer interaction. However, they quickly gained popularity among the general public, and soon, video games became a mainstream form of entertainment.

The first commercially successful video game was “Pong,” which was released in 1972 by Atari. “Pong” was a simple game that involved a ball bouncing around the screen, and two paddles controlled by players that tried to hit the ball back and forth. It was an instant hit and set the stage for the development of more complex video games.

In the following years, video games continued to evolve, with the introduction of more sophisticated graphics, sound, and gameplay mechanics. The popularity of video games also grew, and by the 1980s, they had become a multi-billion dollar industry.

The evolution of video games was also accompanied by the rise of competitive gaming. The first major video game tournament was held in 1972, and it featured the game “Spacewar!” It was a small event, but it marked the beginning of a new era in gaming, where players could compete against each other for prizes and recognition.

As video games continued to improve, so did the competitive gaming scene. Tournaments became larger and more frequent, and new games were added to the competition roster. By the 1990s, competitive gaming had become a mainstream phenomenon, with large tournaments featuring some of the most popular video games of the time, such as “Super Mario Bros.,” “Street Fighter,” and “Doom.”

Overall, the origin of video games can be traced back to the 1960s, with the creation of “Spacewar!” It marked the beginning of a new era in entertainment and paved the way for the development of numerous video games that followed. The popularity of video games also gave rise to competitive gaming, which has become a major part of the gaming industry today.

B. First Esports Competitions

In the early years of esports, competitions were relatively small and informal, often taking place in video game stores or LAN cafes. These early events were mostly focused on fighting games, such as Street Fighter and Super Smash Bros., and were often organized by local gaming communities.

One of the earliest known esports competitions took place in 1972 at Stanford University, where students gathered to compete in the game Spacewar. While not a fighting game, Spacewar was a popular game among the student body and attracted a crowd of competitors.

As the popularity of esports grew, so did the size and scope of competitions. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, tournaments such as the Cyberathlete Professional League (CPL) and the Electronic Sports World Cup (ESWC) emerged, offering large cash prizes and drawing competitors from around the world.

Despite the growth of esports, it was not until the early 2000s that professional gaming leagues and organizations began to form. The formation of these leagues and organizations helped to establish a more structured format for competitions and provided a platform for players to showcase their skills on a larger stage.

Today, esports competitions range from small, local events to massive international tournaments with millions of dollars in prize money. With the continued growth of the industry, it is likely that the popularity and scope of esports competitions will continue to expand in the years to come.

C. Emergence of Professional Esports Players

The early years of esports saw the emergence of professional players who dedicated their lives to mastering video games. These players were often self-taught and had a natural talent for gaming. They started to compete in local tournaments and eventually gained recognition from the gaming community.

One of the earliest professional esports players was John “TotalBiscuit” Bain, who gained fame for his commentary on competitive StarCraft matches. He was known for his in-depth analysis and entertaining personality, which helped to popularize esports.

Another notable player was Kyle “The Maniac” Bolger, who was one of the top players in the early days of Quake III Arena. He was known for his aggressive playing style and was able to dominate his opponents with his lightning-fast reflexes.

As the popularity of esports grew, more and more players began to turn professional. They started to train full-time and develop strategies to improve their gameplay. Many of these players formed teams and started to compete in larger tournaments with bigger prizes.

The emergence of professional esports players helped to establish the foundation for the modern esports industry. It showed that competitive gaming could be a viable career path and inspired others to pursue their dreams of becoming professional gamers. Today, there are thousands of professional esports players around the world, competing in a variety of games and earning millions of dollars in prize money.

III. The Rise of Esports in Asia

Key takeaway: Esports has its roots in the early years of video games, with the first major tournament held in 1972 at Stanford University. Since then, esports has grown to become a multi-billion dollar industry, with professional players, teams, and leagues competing in major tournaments around the world. The growth of esports has been fueled by the rise of competitive gaming culture, with fans tuning in to watch their favorite players and teams compete in major tournaments and leagues. The future of esports looks bright, with advancements in technology, increased professionalism, and a growing global audience, poised for continued growth and success in the years to come.

A. South Korean Esports Scene

South Korea has been instrumental in the growth and development of esports. The country’s unique gaming culture and infrastructure have contributed significantly to the rise of esports. Here are some key factors that have shaped the South Korean esports scene:

  1. Internet Cafe Culture: In the late 1990s and early 2000s, South Korea had a thriving internet cafe culture. These cafe’s offered PC-based online games and served as hubs for gamers to gather, compete, and socialize. This environment fostered the growth of esports by providing a platform for gamers to participate in tournaments and events.
  2. Government Support: The South Korean government has been supportive of the esports industry. In 2002, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism recognized esports as a legitimate sport, leading to the formation of the Korea e-Sports Association (KeSPA). KeSPA played a crucial role in organizing and promoting esports events, creating a professional esports league, and providing support for players.
  3. Professional Teams and Leagues: The establishment of professional teams and leagues was a significant milestone in the growth of esports in South Korea. Teams like Samsung Galaxy White and SK Telecom T1 were formed, and they attracted top players and sponsors. The popularity of these teams led to the creation of the League of Legends Champions Korea (LCK) league, which is considered one of the most competitive and well-organized esports leagues in the world.
  4. Media Coverage and Broadcasting: South Korean broadcasters, such as MBCGame and Ongamenet, have played a vital role in popularizing esports. They have broadcasted esports events live, providing extensive coverage and analysis, and generating interest among viewers. This media exposure has helped to build a strong fan base for esports in the country.
  5. Training Facilities and Academies: The esports scene in South Korea has also been supported by dedicated training facilities and academies. These institutions provide professional coaching, training programs, and resources for aspiring esports players. Many successful players have come from these facilities, contributing to the success of the South Korean esports teams.
  6. Esports Education and Scholarships: The country’s education system has embraced esports, with some universities offering esports-related courses and scholarships. This integration of esports into education has provided opportunities for young gamers to pursue a career in esports while also receiving academic education.

The South Korean esports scene has been characterized by strong government support, a thriving professional scene, and widespread media coverage. These factors have combined to create a dynamic esports ecosystem that has produced some of the most successful and competitive esports teams in the world.

B. Japanese Esports Industry

The Origins of Esports in Japan

Esports in Japan can be traced back to the 1970s, when arcade games like “Space Invaders” gained immense popularity among the youth. These early video games encouraged players to compete against each other, laying the foundation for the growth of competitive gaming in the country.

The Emergence of Professional Esports

The professional esports scene in Japan gained momentum in the 1990s with the introduction of fighting games such as “Street Fighter II.” Tournaments were organized both locally and nationally, drawing large crowds and generating significant interest in the industry. The success of these events paved the way for the establishment of professional esports leagues and organizations, including the Japan e-Sports Professional League (JESPL) and the Cyber Athletes League (CAL).

The Role of Internet Cafe Culture

The rise of internet cafes in Japan played a crucial role in the growth of esports. These establishments provided a platform for gamers to compete against each other and connect with like-minded individuals, fostering a strong esports community. The popularity of online games such as “Final Fantasy XI” and “DotA” further contributed to the development of the esports industry in the country.

The Impact of Esports on Japanese Culture

Esports has had a profound impact on Japanese culture, with many professional players gaining celebrity status and attracting fan followings. Esports events have been broadcasted on television, attracting a wider audience and further legitimizing the industry. The success of Japanese esports teams in international competitions, such as the League of Legends World Championship and the Dota 2 International, has also helped to raise the profile of esports in the country.

Challenges and Opportunities

While the Japanese esports industry has experienced tremendous growth, it has also faced challenges, such as a lack of investment and regulatory hurdles. However, with the increasing popularity of mobile games and the growing interest in esports globally, there are opportunities for the industry to continue to expand and evolve in the future.

C. Impact of Esports on Asian Culture

Esports has had a profound impact on Asian culture, shaping the way people interact, communicate, and entertain themselves. Here are some of the ways in which esports has influenced Asian culture:

  • Esports as a Unifying Force: Esports has brought people together across borders, breaking down barriers of language, culture, and geography. Tournaments and events attract fans from all over the world, creating a sense of community and shared experience. Esports has also created opportunities for players to represent their countries in international competitions, fostering a sense of national pride and identity.
  • Esports as a Career Path: Esports has provided a viable career path for young people in Asia, particularly in countries like South Korea and China. Professional gamers can earn substantial salaries, and the industry has created jobs in areas such as coaching, commentating, and event management. Esports has also attracted investment from venture capitalists and corporations, fueling its growth and legitimacy as a sport.
  • Esports as a Cultural Phenomenon: Esports has become a cultural phenomenon in Asia, with fans following their favorite teams and players, dressing up in cosplay costumes, and attending live events. Esports has also inspired a new wave of creativity, with game developers and designers pushing the boundaries of what is possible in gaming. Esports has also spawned a new industry of influencers and streamers, who have millions of followers and have become cultural icons in their own right.
  • Esports as a Platform for Social Change: Esports has also been used as a platform for social change, promoting values such as diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Esports tournaments have been organized to raise awareness about issues such as climate change, gender equality, and human rights. Esports has also provided a space for marginalized communities to come together and find a voice, promoting empathy and understanding across cultures and borders.

Overall, the impact of esports on Asian culture has been profound and far-reaching. Esports has created new opportunities for young people, inspired creativity and innovation, and brought people together across borders. As esports continues to grow and evolve, it is likely to have an even greater impact on Asian culture and society as a whole.

IV. The Globalization of Esports

A. Growth of Esports in North America

The growth of esports in North America can be traced back to the early 2000s when professional gaming leagues started to emerge. The first major tournament was the World Cyber Games, which was held in 2001 in Seoul, South Korea. This event showcased the potential of esports and sparked interest in North America.

In 2002, the Electronic Sports World Cup (ESWC) was held in Paris, France, and it featured a $100,000 prize pool, which attracted the attention of gamers and investors in North America. This event marked the beginning of the commercialization of esports in the region.

The early 2000s also saw the emergence of Major League Gaming (MLG), which was the first professional gaming league in North America. MLG organized tournaments for games such as StarCraft, Warcraft III, and Halo, and it attracted a large following of gamers and spectators.

The growth of esports in North America continued in the late 2000s with the emergence of new games and tournaments. The rise of games such as League of Legends, Dota 2, and Call of Duty led to the formation of new leagues and tournaments, such as the North American League of Legends Championship Series (LCS) and the Call of Duty World League (CODWL).

Today, esports has become a major industry in North America, with professional teams and players earning millions of dollars in prize money and sponsorships. The North American esports market is estimated to be worth billions of dollars, and it continues to grow as more investors and brands recognize the potential of esports as a form of entertainment and a means of engaging with young audiences.

B. Expansion of Esports in Europe

Esports in Europe experienced a significant expansion during the early 2000s, as internet connectivity improved and broadband access became more widespread. This enabled gamers to compete in real-time against opponents from other parts of the world, which in turn led to the emergence of organized esports tournaments and leagues in Europe.

One of the earliest and most prominent esports events in Europe was the World Cyber Games (WCG), which was first held in Seoul, South Korea in 2001. The WCG featured a variety of games, including first-person shooters, real-time strategy games, and fighting games, and attracted top professional gamers from around the world. European teams and players quickly began to make their mark on the international esports scene, with teams from countries such as Sweden, Denmark, and Finland achieving notable success in the WCG and other tournaments.

As esports continued to grow in popularity throughout Europe, a number of dedicated esports organizations and teams emerged, with sponsorship and investment from companies such as Samsung, Coca-Cola, and Toshiba. These organizations helped to professionalize the scene, with structured training programs, salaries for players, and dedicated coaching staff.

The growth of esports in Europe was also fueled by the rise of online gaming platforms and social networks, which provided new avenues for gamers to connect and compete with one another. Platforms such as Steam, Xbox Live, and PlayStation Network allowed players to easily organize and participate in online tournaments and leagues, which in turn helped to foster a sense of community and competition among gamers.

In addition to the WCG, other major esports events in Europe during this period included the Electronic Sports World Cup (ESWC), which was first held in Paris in 2003, and the DreamHack festivals, which began in Sweden in 1994 and quickly grew to become one of the largest gaming events in the world.

Today, esports in Europe continues to thrive, with major leagues and tournaments such as the League of Legends European Championship (LEC) and the FIFA eWorld Cup attracting large audiences and significant investment from sponsors and broadcasters. The continent remains a hub of innovation and experimentation in the world of esports, with a strong focus on developing new technologies and business models to support the growth of the industry.

C. Current State of Esports in Other Regions

Esports has experienced significant growth and expansion beyond its roots in South Korea, becoming a global phenomenon with a large and dedicated fan base. The following are some of the key developments and trends in the current state of esports in other regions:

The United States

The United States has emerged as one of the most significant markets for esports, with a growing number of professional teams, leagues, and tournaments. Major sports franchises such as the Dallas Cowboys and the New England Patriots have invested in esports teams, while traditional sports leagues such as the NBA and NFL have explored partnerships with esports organizations.

Europe

Europe has also seen rapid growth in the esports industry, with many countries now hosting their own professional leagues and tournaments. Countries such as the United Kingdom, Germany, and France have a strong presence in the esports scene, with several successful teams and players coming from these regions.

China

China has become one of the largest markets for esports, with a large and passionate fan base. The country has its own professional leagues, such as the League of Legends Pro League, and has hosted major international tournaments such as the World Electronic Sports Games.

Latin America

Latin America has also seen significant growth in the esports industry, with countries such as Brazil and Mexico producing successful teams and players. The Latin American Esports League is one of the region’s major professional leagues, and Brazil has hosted several major international tournaments, including the World Cup of Esports.

Overall, the current state of esports in other regions reflects the global appeal and popularity of competitive gaming. With the continued growth and expansion of the industry, it is likely that esports will continue to gain popularity and recognition as a legitimate sport around the world.

V. The Art and Culture of Esports

A. Role of Art in Esports

The integration of art and culture in esports has played a significant role in shaping the industry into what it is today. Esports events and competitions have evolved from simple gaming tournaments to grand spectacles that combine the latest technology, innovative design, and creative storytelling.

Art in esports encompasses various forms, including game design, visual effects, sound design, and live event production. These elements are intertwined to create an immersive and engaging experience for both players and spectators.

Game design plays a crucial role in shaping the competitive landscape of esports. Developers carefully craft game mechanics, balance gameplay, and create unique game worlds that inspire competitive play. Game design also encompasses the creation of esports-specific features, such as ranked matchmaking, spectator modes, and tournament support, which enable players to engage in competitive play and fans to enjoy the experience.

Visual effects and sound design are integral to the esports experience. These elements create a sense of immersion and enhance the overall aesthetic of esports events. They are used to convey important information, such as player health, power-ups, and scoreboards, as well as to create a dynamic and exciting atmosphere during live events.

Live event production is another area where art and culture intersect with esports. Esports events have evolved from small gatherings in basements and arcades to large-scale productions that rival traditional sporting events. These events feature elaborate stage designs, lighting, and sound systems, as well as advanced broadcasting and streaming technology that allow millions of fans to watch from around the world.

The role of art in esports is not limited to the realm of competitive gaming. Esports teams and organizations have also embraced art and culture as a way to differentiate themselves and build a strong brand identity. Teams often collaborate with artists and designers to create unique logos, uniforms, and merchandise that reflect their values and culture.

Overall, the role of art in esports is essential to its growth and success. It provides a creative outlet for developers, players, and fans, while also contributing to the industry’s cultural impact and global appeal.

B. Influence of Esports on Popular Culture

Esports has had a significant impact on popular culture, shaping the way people perceive and engage with video games. The rise of esports has led to the development of new genres, the emergence of professional players, and the growth of a global fan base. In this section, we will explore the influence of esports on popular culture.

Esports has played a major role in shaping the gaming industry, with new games being developed specifically for competitive play. The popularity of games like Dota 2 and League of Legends has led to the creation of entire leagues and tournaments dedicated to these titles. As a result, the gaming industry has seen a significant shift towards competitive gaming, with developers now creating games with competitive play in mind.

In addition to the development of new games, esports has also led to the emergence of professional players. These players have become celebrities in their own right, with large followings and lucrative sponsorship deals. Professional players have also helped to raise the bar for skill and competition in the gaming world, pushing the boundaries of what is possible in video games.

Esports has also had a significant impact on the entertainment industry. Live streaming platforms like Twitch have become popular sources of entertainment, with millions of viewers tuning in to watch their favorite players compete. Esports tournaments have also become major events, with large crowds and big-name sponsors. The growth of esports has created new opportunities for the entertainment industry, leading to the development of new forms of media and content.

Esports has also had a cultural impact, with the rise of new communities and subcultures. Fans of esports have created their own languages, memes, and traditions, creating a unique and vibrant culture around competitive gaming. This culture has helped to shape the way people perceive video games, making them a legitimate form of entertainment and a viable career path for many.

In conclusion, the influence of esports on popular culture has been significant. From the development of new games to the emergence of professional players, esports has had a profound impact on the gaming industry and beyond. As esports continues to grow and evolve, it will be interesting to see how it shapes the future of entertainment and culture.

C. The Future of Esports Art and Culture

The future of esports art and culture is poised for growth and evolution, with the potential to shape the broader esports industry in exciting new ways. Here are some of the key trends and developments to watch for:

  • Increased Integration of Art and Storytelling: As the esports industry continues to mature, there is a growing recognition of the importance of art and storytelling in creating immersive and engaging experiences for fans. This includes not only the visual and graphical design of games and esports events, but also the use of narrative and storytelling to create compelling characters and plotlines.
  • Expanded Participation from Creative Professionals: With the increasing popularity of esports, there is a growing interest from creative professionals in the industry. This includes artists, writers, and designers who are seeking to bring their skills and expertise to the world of esports, creating new opportunities for collaboration and innovation.
  • The Rise of Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality: The integration of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technologies is expected to have a significant impact on the future of esports art and culture. These technologies offer new possibilities for immersive and interactive experiences, and are likely to drive innovation in areas such as game design, visual effects, and user interface.
  • The Importance of Diversity and Inclusion: As the esports industry continues to grow and diversify, there is a growing recognition of the importance of diversity and inclusion in the art and culture of esports. This includes not only the representation of diverse voices and perspectives in the content and experiences created for fans, but also the need to foster a culture of inclusivity and accessibility within the industry itself.
  • The Potential for Esports as a Platform for Social Change: Esports has the potential to be a powerful platform for social change, and the art and culture of esports can play a critical role in this. This includes the use of games and other digital media to raise awareness of important social issues, as well as the creation of content that challenges and subverts traditional norms and expectations.

Overall, the future of esports art and culture is full of exciting possibilities, and is likely to play a critical role in shaping the broader esports industry in the years to come. As the industry continues to evolve and grow, it will be important to stay attuned to these trends and developments, and to remain open to new ideas and innovations.

B. Current State of Esports

The current state of esports is one of rapid growth and increasing recognition as a legitimate form of competition and entertainment. With the rise of internet technology and the proliferation of online gaming, esports has seen a surge in popularity in recent years. In 2021, the global esports market was valued at over $1 billion, with a projected growth rate of 27.9% over the next five years.

One of the key factors driving the growth of esports is the increasing professionalization of the industry. Many top-tier games now have professional leagues and tournaments, with salaried players and coaches. Major brands and investors are also getting in on the action, with sponsorships and endorsements becoming commonplace in the esports world.

In addition to the financial success of esports, the culture and community surrounding the industry are also thriving. Online platforms like Twitch and YouTube have become hubs for esports content, with millions of viewers tuning in to watch live streams and competitions. Esports events, both online and offline, attract massive crowds and often sell out stadiums and arenas.

However, with this growth comes challenges and controversies. Issues such as player burnout, cheating, and the commodification of gaming have led to debates about the ethics and sustainability of the esports industry. Despite these challenges, the current state of esports is one of excitement and possibility, as the industry continues to evolve and mature.

C. Future of Esports

Esports has come a long way since its humble beginnings in the 1970s. Today, it is a billion-dollar industry with a global audience of millions. So, what does the future hold for esports? Here are some key trends and developments to watch out for:

  • Increased Mainstream Acceptance: Esports has already gained significant mainstream acceptance, with major brands like Coca-Cola and PepsiCo investing in the industry. As more and more companies recognize the potential of esports, we can expect to see it become even more mainstream in the coming years.
  • Global Expansion: Esports has already taken root in many countries around the world, but there is still significant room for growth. As more and more people gain access to the internet and gaming technology, we can expect to see the popularity of esports continue to grow in regions like Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
  • Advancements in Technology: The development of new technologies is constantly changing the landscape of esports. For example, the rise of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) could revolutionize the way games are played and watched. We can also expect to see more sophisticated data analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) being used to improve gameplay and enhance the viewer experience.
  • New Revenue Streams: Esports is already a lucrative industry, but there is still room for growth. One area that is expected to see significant expansion is the merchandise market. As the popularity of esports continues to grow, we can expect to see more and more fans wanting to show their support for their favorite teams and players through merchandise.
  • Increased Professionalism: Esports is becoming more and more professional, with players signing multi-year contracts and teams investing in top-level training facilities. As the industry continues to mature, we can expect to see even more professionalization, with better pay and benefits for players, and more structured leagues and tournaments.

Overall, the future of esports looks bright. With a growing global audience, advancements in technology, and increased professionalism, it is poised for continued growth and success in the years to come.

FAQs

1. What is esports?

Esports, short for electronic sports, refers to organized competitions between players or teams in video games. These competitions can be local, regional, or global and are often broadcasted live to audiences worldwide.

2. When did esports start?

Esports have their roots in the 1970s, but it wasn’t until the 1990s that they began to gain mainstream recognition. The first esports tournament was held in 1972, called the “Spacewar tournament,” and it featured a competition between two players playing the game Spacewar on a PDP-1 computer.

3. How did esports evolve over time?

Esports have come a long way since the 1970s. As video games became more popular, so did esports. Tournaments began to be held in larger venues, with larger prizes, and more participants. In the 2000s, esports really took off with the rise of online gaming and the popularity of games like World of Warcraft and Starcraft. Today, esports is a multi-billion dollar industry with professional players, teams, and leagues.

4. What are some popular esports games?

There are many popular esports games, but some of the most well-known include Dota 2, League of Legends, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Fortnite, and Overwatch. These games have large player bases and attract millions of viewers to their tournaments.

5. How do players become professional esports athletes?

Players can become professional esports athletes by honing their skills, building a reputation, and competing in tournaments. Some players also train at esports academies or join professional teams. Esports requires a combination of skill, strategy, and teamwork, making it a challenging and exciting field to compete in.

6. Where can I watch esports tournaments?

Esports tournaments can be watched online on platforms like Twitch, YouTube, and Dota 2’s The International tournament has a viewership of over 1 million people. Esports tournaments are also broadcasted on traditional television channels, with major networks like ESPN and TBS airing esports events.

7. Is esports a recognized sport?

Esports is recognized as a sport by a growing number of organizations and governments. In 2018, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced that it would consider including esports in future Olympic Games. Additionally, some countries have their own esports federations and teams.

8. What is the future of esports?

The future of esports looks bright, with the industry expected to continue to grow. As technology advances and more people around the world gain access to the internet, the number of esports players and viewers is likely to increase. Esports is also expected to become more mainstream, with more traditional sports organizations and broadcasters getting involved.

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